Tag Archives: Women

3 Seattle Podcasts With Unique Voices

By Kate Clark | Special to The Seattle Times

Anyone can talk about anything.

That’s the beauty of podcasting, says Eula Scott Bynoe. She’s one-third of “Hella Black Hella Seattle,” a new podcast creating community for people of color in Seattle.

Bynoe, Jasmine Jackson and Alaina Caldwell started “Hella Black Hella Seattle” in May because, they say, there was nothing like it, and there needed to be. They planned to take a break from the podcast (hellablackhellaseattle.com) in September, but after an overwhelmingly positive response, they decided to keep it up.

“You know this is such a cis-gender, white city,” Bynoe says. “It is that weird thing where you see people of color but you don’t see them, we walk by them but we don’t hear them, we don’t know what’s going on with them. A real big part of the show, too, is to say a lot of people are here and they are doing really amazing things that are being recognized world-round, but not necessarily in our backyard.”

Listening to “Hella Black Hella Seattle” is like dropping in on a conversation, with the trio discussing topics ranging from race to Seattle’s best happy hours, as well as interviewing at least one significant Seattleite per episode.

“We are hella black and hella Seattle, that’s what we are promoting,” Caldwell explains. “If you identify with one of those that’s awesome; if you don’t, that’s not what we are trying to do for you.”

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5 tips for first-time female angel investors

BY on February 4, 2016 at 5:35 pm

Katherine Hague wants more women investing in startups.

The Female Funders founder stopped by Seattle’s Columbia City Club on Thursday morning for the final stop of her eight-city Female Funders breakfast series. She was joined by fellow female angel investors Gillian Muessig, co-founder of Moz; Outlines Venture Group Anne Kennedy; and Seattle Angel Fund Managing Member Susan Preston.

The group shared advice for female investors looking to make their first angel investment. Hague, who runs an online resource for both experienced and aspiring angel investors at Female Funders, wants 1,000 more women making angel investments by the end of 2016.

“Only 3 percent of deal-making venture capitalists are women, and this number has led to an even more troubling statistic — that only 2.7 percent of venture capitalist funding goes to female CEOs,” she noted today.

Hague raised cash from angels for her first company, an e-commerce platform for hardware startups called ShopLocket. She sold that company at just 23 years old and was named one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women in 2014. She then launched Female Funders and Angel School, a boot camp for investors or entrepreneurs, to get more women interested in these fields.

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A labor of love: Women’s Center helps area high school students apply to UW

Every chair in the UW’s Cunningham Hall Women’s Center is taken. Some of the dozens of high school seniors are sitting on the floor instead, where they are nervously editing essays and adding last minute touches to their UW undergraduate applications.

“There’s literally no room,” one high school senior said as she and a volunteer tutor tucked themselves away in a corner of the conference room, in between a stack of Domino’s pizza and another table packed with students, chair legs entangled.

The Women’s Center program, Making Connections, hosts an Application Night every year on Nov. 30, the evening before the UW’s application is due. Making Connections is geared toward getting low-income Seattle-area high school students interested in the science, technology, engineering, and math fields, as well as preparing these students for college. Most of the 105 students from over 20 high schools are the first in their families to go to college. In 2014, 92 percent of those enrolled in the program were women, and 87 percent of the graduating seniors ended up going to the UW.

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By Kate Clark

Making Connections is led by Assistant Director of the Women’s Center, Senait Habte, and STEM Enrichment Coordinator, Kelsey Johnson, but it began with Pat Dawson. In 1998, Dawson, a surgeon and member of the Women’s Center Advisory Board, realized how much trouble her daughter was having in the sciences despite all the resources at her disposal. That realization inspired her to lead the Women’s Center in applying for a grant, and Making Connections was born.

Habte, who took over Making Connections in 2006 after working in the UW’s Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity, said this all began at a time when STEM wasn’t the buzzword it is today.

“We believe in hands-on,” Habte said. “If we can’t show these students what’s possible, how can they ever start to dream?”

The program hosts other events in addition to application night, when students race to finish their essays and applications and experience the excitement of a crowd cheering for them as they click the submit button. The Parent College Information workshop educates parents — many of whom are immigrants or refugees who didn’t go to college and who aren’t familiar with the complicated and drawn-out college application process.

While the Making Connections program is able to take graduating seniors on a statewide college tour, parents are typically unable to make the same trip. Habte said events like this make up for some parents’ lack of access to information about these colleges.

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By Kate Clark

It is a way to open their eyes, Johnson added.

“One of the parents came up to me afterward and she was like, ‘Oh my god, I am so glad I came, I had no idea how much work goes into this, I was telling my child that she needs to come home, cook dinner, help me take care of my six other children, and I am not letting her come to the center to do anything on college applications. Coming to this event just completely changed my outlook on this,’” Johnson said.

After earning her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and working in civil engineering on the east coast, Johnson joined AmeriCorps and moved across the country to work at the Women’s Center.

“I was looking for a change in my life,” Johnson said. “At the end of the day I was just like, ‘What am I doing, how am I helping people? I don’t feel like I am making a difference.’ I want to help and I want to make a difference and I believe that females need that extra support and guidance when it comes to studying the sciences, and math, and engineering — I went through it.”

Johnson will be working at the Women’s Center until the end of July.

Habte, on the other hand, has been involved in pre-college work for years. She said it’s her life’s work and passion.

“I’ve always been a helper and thrived off of helping people, particularly students,” Habte said. “It is gratifying to see those students, shaping them, connecting them, and guiding them through that entire process and watching them evolve over time. Now we have students who are here at UW, we are getting students that are graduated that are serving on my advisory board. It is really an amazing process to see them come full circle.”

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By Kate Clark

In 2014, 84 percent of the students in Making Connections qualified for free or reduced price lunch and many of them came from high schools and communities in the area that have been consistently ridiculed over the years, according to Habte.

“Oftentimes, they feel like they are inferior because we’ve been telling them since kindergarten how awful their schools are or how awful their communities are, and they kind of start to believe that,” Habte said. “We are trying to undo that — to make them understand that they are great.”

Habte said she is always reminding her students that they have every right to be at the UW, that it is their university; she hopes to change their attitudes.

“You have opened the door and their eyes to something and there is no turning back because as long as we keep them engaged and we show them the possibility, that is the biggest thing you can give students — a sense of self and of what’s possible,” Habte said. “They are amazing students, they teach us so much, as much as I like to say we are helping students, they feed our soul. They are amazing and dynamic students and they have gone through so much, and to see how resilient they are — they are making a difference.”

Reach News Editor Kate Clark at news@dailyuw.com. Twitter: @KateClarkUW